Amyl and the Sniffers, Fraidycat web follower, Mogwai

Let's shake some of my browser tabs and see what falls out. Fraidycat web follower / feed reader RSS has been on the decline since Google snuffed Google Reader. Many sites, these days, don't even support RSS. It's a problem. One solution that might fit the bill for many users is Fraidycat. It comes as … Continue reading Amyl and the Sniffers, Fraidycat web follower, Mogwai

[Review] Contempt of Court: The Turn-of-the-Century Lynching that Launched a Hundred Years of Federalism

More than 100 years ago in Chattanooga, Tennessee, a black man named Ed Johnson was dragged from his jail cell and taken to the Walnut Street Bridge and lynched. That Johnson was almost certainly innocent, and that he was already condemned to die by hanging, mattered not at all to the mob that wanted to … Continue reading [Review] Contempt of Court: The Turn-of-the-Century Lynching that Launched a Hundred Years of Federalism

Weekend Reading: “They Eat Puppies, Don’t They?” and “No Country for Old Men”

Knocked down a couple of fiction books this weekend while traveling to and from Southeast LinuxFest. They Eat Puppies, Don’t They? by Christopher Buckley, and No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy. I’ve been a fan of Christopher Buckley since I picked up Little Green Men years ago, but he’s probably best known for Thank You for Smoking. … Continue reading Weekend Reading: “They Eat Puppies, Don’t They?” and “No Country for Old Men”

[Review] The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood

A few years ago, I came late to The Wire, but caught up quickly. Usually I’m not one to buy the hype for television series, but I had to admit that The Wire was every bit as powerful, funny, and eye-opening as its fans claimed. It’s a show that you tell friends “you need to … Continue reading [Review] The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood

Book Review: Gulp by Mary Roach

Mary Roach’s Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal is typical of her books, which is to say it’s a highly enjoyable read that belies the amount of research that’s obviously gone into the work. Like her other books, Stiff, Bonk, Spook, etc., Roach takes a topic that doesn’t necessarily lend itself to polite conversation – and then … Continue reading Book Review: Gulp by Mary Roach