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  • jzb 5:42 pm on November 5, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Atomic, , IRC, Pondering, Slack   

    Proprietary tools for FOSS projects 

    slackMy position on free and open source software is somewhere in the spectrum between hard-core FSF/GNU position on Free Software, and the corporate open source pragmatism that looks at open source as being great for some things but really not a goal in and of itself. I don’t eschew all proprietary software, and I’m not going to knock people for using tools and devices that fit their needs rather than sticking only to FOSS.

    At the same time, I think it’s important that we trend towards everything being open, and I find myself troubled by the increasing acceptance of proprietary tools and services by FOSS developers/projects. It shouldn’t be the end of the world for a FOSS developer, advocate, project, or company to use proprietary tools if necessary. Sometimes the FOSS tools aren’t a good fit, and the need for something right now overrides the luxury of choosing a tool just based on licensing preference. And, of course, there’s a big difference between having that discussion for a project like Fedora, or an Apache podling/TLP, or a company that works with open source.

    Fedora is generally averse to adopting anything proprietary, even using things like YouTube or Twitter to promote Fedora tends to generate discussion and questions about whether it’s proper to use proprietary services. Grudgingly, though, most folks have accepted that to promote Fedora you have to go where the people are–even if that means using non-FOSS services. Apache has been more willing to adopt non-free services (e.g., Jira) where acceptable FOSS services exist. Not surprising, because Apache’s culture is more “use open source because it’s pragmatic” rather than driven by ideology. (That is painting with a very broad brush, and I think you can find a diverse set of opinions within Apache, including mine.)

    Generally, though, I worry about making too many concessions to non-free software. I worry that we’ve gone too far towards business concerns, and too far away from wanting to change the world for the better. There’s a balance to be struck, I think, where we put food on the table, build successful companies and successful and sustainable communities. Where we use tools we’ve built to do our work, and tools we can improve, but don’t rake people over the coals because of the tools they choose or make bad business decisions out of a desire for purity.

    This post asking people not to use Slack really resonates with me. I see this as a wholly unnecessary adoption of proprietary software where there’s a reasonable and serviceable alternative. The good news, I think, is that Slack seems to be spurring some development of better IRC alternatives that might not have developed without Slack. And it’s spurred more people thinking about the tools they use, and whether they’re open, and what that means. Full disclosure, I have a personal Slack account. I’ll use it to chat with friends, just like I’ll use Facebook or Google Hangouts. But I don’t see recommending it for an official channel for, say, Project Atomic.

     
  • jzb 12:14 pm on October 27, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Atomic, Docker   

    Looking for a Community Lead for Project Atomic 

    PA-Logo-Solid-Vertical.svg One of the most exciting projects I’m getting to work with these days is Project Atomic. It touches on the full stack–from OS development to storage, to networking, containers, application development, and pretty much everything in between. Red Hat is working hard on the tools to develop, deploy, and manage containerized applications.

    As part of that effort, I’m looking to find a lead for community efforts around Project Atomic and our container tools. (Job description on the Red Hat Jobs site.)

    Ideally, we’ll find someone with some experience using Linux, Docker, Kubernetes, and so on. Also looking for someone with strong community background, able to work in the open and manage a number of open conversations across projects. Experience with the Fedora and CentOS projects a major plus.

    There’s a ton of work to do, and things are moving really fast–so it’s definitely going to require someone well-organized and eager to stay on the leading edge of technology while the container ecosystem continues to move at a crazy pace. But, you’ll have the chance to work with a great team full of smart, friendly folks who are seriously passionate about open source.

    Know somebody who’d be fantastic? Drop me a note. Username is jzb, and I work for Red Hat – shoot me an email with a resume! You can also find me on Twitter and occasionally on Freenode if you have any questions.

     
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